Singapore Angelfish

  • Scientific Name – Chaetodontoplus mesoleucus
  • Family – Pomacanthidae
  • Origin – Southern Japan south to Indonesia and Papua New Guinea
  • Size – 18 centimetres (7 inches)
  • Temperature – 23°C – 28°C (74°F – 82°F)
  • PH – pH of 8.1 to 8.4
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Product Description

  • Scientific Name – Chaetodontoplus mesoleucus
  • Family – Pomacanthidae
  • Origin – Southern Japan south to Indonesia and Papua New Guinea
  • Size – 18 centimetres (7 inches)
  • Temperature – 23°C – 28°C (74°F – 82°F)
  • PH – pH of 8.1 to 8.4
  • Specific Gravity (Salinity) – 020 to 1.025
  • Aquarium Size (Minimum) – 400 litres (100 Gallons)
  • Appearance (Physical Description) – yellow head, white mid-body and a black rear half. The black area is also covered with white.
  • Diet – mysid shrimp, frozen preparations for herbivores and finely chopped seafood. Live rock and algae to graze on
  • Feeding Frequency – two to three times daily
  • Compatibility- *See Compatibility chart*
  • Aggression – not aggressive
  • Difficulty to keep – moderate
  • Captive Breeding – no

Overview:

The Singapore angelfish is a very elegant-looking species that until recently was thought to exhibit two different tail fin colours — a yellow tail form and a grey tail form. Recent studies have demonstrated that these are two distinct species, the Singapore angelfish (Chaetodontoplus mesoleucus) and the grey tail angelfish (Chaetodontoplus poliourus), both of which are available in the aquarium trade. If you can get a hold of a healthy Singapore angelfish specimen, Chaetodontoplus mesoleucus usually does very well in an established aquarium. Both the Singapore angelfish and grey tail angelfish tend to acclimate more quickly and live longer in a reef aquarium, where they have plenty of algae and sessile invertebrates (encrusting sponges) to graze upon. If you have a fish-only aquarium, try cultivating a healthy crop of filamentous algae before adding a Singapore angelfish. The Singapore angelfish is always shy when initially added to the aquarium, thus, good refuges and non-combative neighbours will be essential to ensure acclimation. If picked on, the Singapore angelfish will not feed, and is likely to succumb to parasites or disease. The Singapore angelfish is occasionally afflicted with Cryptocaryon, Amyloodinium, Uronema and Lymphocystis.