Reticulated Damselfish

  • Scientific Name- Dascyllus reticulates
  • Family- Pomacentridae
  • Origin- Cocos Keeling Islands in the eastern Indian Ocean to Samoa in the Pacific.
  • Size- 8 centimetres (3 inches)
  • Temperature- 24°C – 28°C (75°F – 82°F)
  • PH – 8.1 to 8.4
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Product Description

  • Scientific Name- Dascyllus reticulates
  • Family- Pomacentridae
  • Origin- Cocos Keeling Islands in the eastern Indian Ocean to Samoa in the Pacific.
  • Size- 8 centimetres (3 inches)
  • Temperature- 24°C – 28°C (75°F – 82°F)
  • PH – 8.1 to 8.4
  • Specific Gravity (Salinity) – 1.020 to 1.025
  • Aquarium Size (Minimum)- 120 Litres (30 gallons)
  • Appearance (Physical Description) – The reticulate damselfish is a deep-bodied damsel that is pale bluish-grey overall with black-edged scales. There is a black bar that runs from the front of the dorsal fin to the anal fin (which is also dusky in colour). It also has black lips.
  • Diet- finely chopped seafood, fish eggs, mysid shrimp, preparations for herbivores and flake food.
  • Feeding Frequency – daily
  • Compatibility- *See Compatibility chart*
  • Aggression – Juvenile is peaceful, Adult can be aggressive.
  • Difficulty to keep – easy
  • Captive Breeding – yes

Overview:

This species is very peaceful as a juvenile but as they grow they can become very bossy. They will mostly show aggression towards fish that come near its preferred hangout (often a branching coral colony) and may even harass more passive species to the point of causing them to hide constantly. It is advisable to keep them in an aquarium with more moderately aggressive species (such as pygmy angelfish, other damselfish, hawkfish, larger wrasses, rabbitfish and surgeonfish). As is the case most times with aggression, a smaller aquarium will lead to more aggression and a large aquarium will normally see all species interacting without any aggression. The reticulate damselfish does well in the reef aquarium and groups of these fish may actually benefit small-polyped stony coral colonies. Their presence among the branches of these corals helps irrigate the entire colony with fresh, oxygenated seawater and the ammonia the reticulate damselfish releases may be used by the coral as a nutrient.