Naso Tang / Orange-Spine Unicornfish

  • Scientific Name: Naso Lituratus
  • Family: Acanthuridae
  • Origin: Pacific Ocean, from Honshu in Japan to New Caledonia and Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. Eastwards, its range proceeds to Hawaii, French Polynesia, and Pitcairn. This species is also found in the waters of Clipperton Island in the Eastern Pacific.
  • Size: 45 centimetres (18 inches).
  • Temperature: 72°C – 29°C (80°F – 84°F)
  • PH – 8.1 to 8.4
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Product Description

  • Scientific Name: Naso Lituratus
  • Family: Acanthuridae
  • Origin: Pacific Ocean, from Honshu in Japan to New Caledonia and Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. Eastwards, its range proceeds to Hawaii, French Polynesia, and Pitcairn. This species is also found in the waters of Clipperton Island in the Eastern Pacific.
  • Size: 45 centimetres (18 inches).
  • Temperature: 72°C – 29°C (80°F – 84°F)
  • PH – 8.1 to 8.4
  • Specific Gravity (Salinity) – 1.020 to 1.025
  • Aquarium Size (Minimum) – 475 Litres (125 gallons)
  • Appearances (Physical Description) – the Naso tang has a black dorsal fin and the black colour continues in the form of a pointed projection over the nape. The body is of a greyish brown shade and a prominent yellow line runs from the back of the mouth up to the eye. In addition to this, the fish is decorated with a pale blue line at the base of the dorsal fin, and both dorsal and anal fins have narrow blue margins and black sub marginal linings. The anal fin is chiefly orange. The caudal fin sports a yellow sub marginal band posteriorly. On both sides of the caudal peduncle, you can see a pair of spines surrounded by a bright orange area. Having two “scalpels” (spines) on each side of the tail fin. The Naso tang can rapidly change its colours depending on mood and environment. When this fish needs to hide or gets exited, it can become black with irregular patches of grey.
  • Diet – leafy brown algae (natural growth within the aquarium), nori sheets, brine shrimp and mysid shrimps.
  • Feeding Frequency – Grazes throughout the day.
  • Compatibility- *See Compatibility chart*
  • Aggression – aggressive towards species of its own genus and other surgeonfish.
  • Difficulty to keep – shy and hard to acclimate to aquariums but once acclimated it can be a rather hardy fish and easy to maintain.
  • Captive Breeding – no

 

Overview:

The Naso Tang is definitely a beautiful specimen to keep in your tank.  The great thing about the Naso Tang is that they are fine in a reef setting with inverts and corals, and they will graze on the algae. On rare occasions they have been known to nip on both hard and soft corals, but this problem can be easily dealt with by simply feeding more often. Provide lots of algae, prepared frozen formulas containing algae or spirulina, and flakes. Japanese Nori or other seaweed can be adhered to the aquarium glass with a vegetable clip. It will also feed on some frozen brine and mysis shrimp, mosquito larvae, grindal worms, tubifex, and Enchytaeidae. Live rock with heavy algae growth will be greatly appreciated as it will allow this fish to constantly scrape with its rasping teeth. They are susceptible to nutritional disorders which may cause colour loss and LLD (lateral line disease). Supplementing their diet with the addition of vitamin C to their food or adding a vitamin supplement directly to their water can help to avoid or aid in reducing these ailments. They are also susceptible to bacteria resulting from organic build-up which deteriorates water quality. Consequently they will need vigorous filtration, protein skimming, and regular small water changes. All in all if this species is kept within a large enough aquarium that has perfect water parameters and if its diet is maintained you can be assured that your specimen will be healthy and in perfect condition.