Flame Angelfish

  • Scientific Name – Centropyge loriculus
  • Family – Pomacanthidae
  • Origin – Christmas Island, Indonesia, Marshall Islands, Tahiti, Vanuatu.
  • Size – 10 centimetres (4 inches)
  • Temperature – 23°C – 28°C (74°F – 82°F)
  • PH – pH of 8.1 to 8.4
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Product Description

  • Scientific Name – Centropyge loriculus
  • Family – Pomacanthidae
  • Origin – Christmas Island, Indonesia, Marshall Islands, Tahiti, Vanuatu.
  • Size – 10 centimetres (4 inches)
  • Temperature – 23°C – 28°C (74°F – 82°F)
  • PH – pH of 8.1 to 8.4
  • Specific Gravity (Salinity) – 020 to 1.025
  • Aquarium Size (Minimum) – 300 litres (70 gallons)
  • Appearance (Physical Description) – Brilliant orange (the centre of the body is yellow-orange) with darker tiger stripes on the body. There are also blue bars at the edge of the dorsal and anal fins.
  • Diet – will do best in a healthy, mature reef aquarium or an aged aquarium that has a good crop of filamentous algae. The flame angelfish will graze on diatoms and algae present in the aquarium, which can help supplement added foods or may even make up the bulk of its captive diet. Frozen preparations for herbivores, frozen mysids, frozen fish eggs and finely grated frozen seafood, spirulina and marine algae.
  • Feeding Frequency – two to three times daily depending on availability of natural fodder.
  • Compatibility- *See Compatibility chart*
  • Aggression – semi-aggressive
  • Difficulty to keep – moderate, some individuals do well, while others struggle acclimating to their new aquarium.
  • Captive Breeding – highly difficult

Overview:

The flame angelfish needs lots of hiding places and live rock for grazing. It is prone to nipping at stony and soft corals and clam mantles. This species should be the last fish to introduce to a community tank. Like all angelfish, the flame angelfish will sometimes succumb to parasites, such as Cryptocaryon and Amyloodinium. The flame angelfish can usually be trusted in the reef aquarium, although it has been known to pick at corals on occasion (usually large-polyped stony varieties). If well fed, it is less likely to go bad!